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Relatively Formulaic Factual Allegations Held Sufficient to Satisfy Rule 8 Pleading Under Twombly; FLSA Held a Proper Predicate to UCL Claim; Fees Prayer Under C.C.P. § 1021.5 Stricken

In Attorney's Fees, C.C.P. § 1021.5, FLSA, Rule 8, Unfair Competition Law on November 16, 2010 at 8:23 am
CALABASAS, CA - JULY 18:  The Countrywide Fina...
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The United States District Court for the Central District of California held that (1) relatively formulaic pleadings in a wage and hour case were sufficient to meet the pleading requirements of Rule 8, even under Twombly and Iqbal; (2) the FLSA is a proper predicate for a UCL claim; and (3) plaintiffs’ prayer for attorneys fees under Cal. Code Civ. Proc. section 1021.5 should be stricken. Whitaker v. Countrywide Financial Corp., No. CV CAS 09-5898 (PJWx), 2010 WL 4537098 (C.D. Cal. Nov. 1, 2010).

Background

A putative class action was brought on behalf of current and former employees of Countrywide Financial Corporation and Countrywide Home Loans, Inc. (the “Countrywide Defendants”) against the Countrywide Defendants and Bank of America, the alleged successor employer and/or successor in liability to the Countrywide Defendants. Id. *1. The FAC alleges claims for: (1) failure to pay overtime in violation of Cal. Labor Code s 510 and s 1194 and IWC Wage Order 4-2001; (2) Cal. Labor Code s 203 waiting penalties; (3) failure to provide an accurate itemized wage statement pursuant to Cal. Labor Code s 226; (4) failure to pay minimum wage in violation of Cal. Labor Code s 1194 and IWC Wage Order No. 4-2001; (5) failure to pay minimum and overtime wages in violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act, 29 U.S.C. s 206(a); and (7) unfair competition pursuant to Cal. Business & Professions Code, s 17200 et seq. Id. Defendants moved to dismiss or strike plaintiffs’ first amended complaint.  Id.

Discussion

Defendants argued that plaintiffs’ claims should be dismissed because they are factually devoid and simply “parrot the statutory language and proffer purely conclusory allegations”, thereby running afoul of the standards set out in Bell Atlantic Corp. v. Twombly, 127 S.Ct. 1955, 1964-65 (2007) and Ashcroft v. Iqbal, 556 U.S. ___, 129 S.Ct. 1937 (2009). Read the rest of this entry »

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After Substantial Litigation and Full Arbitration, Second District Reverses Order Compelling Arbitration Finding That Defendants Waived Right to Arbitrate

In Uncategorized on November 15, 2010 at 9:23 am
Day 222 (Or is this Day 1 now?) - Oops!
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The Second District Court of Appeal reversed an order compelling arbitration after the conclusion of an arbitration and judicial confirmation of the arbitration award because defendants waived their right to arbitrate.  Knight v. Toe Brights, Inc., et al., No. B220648, 2010 WL 4542324 (Cal. App. 2d Dist. Nov. 12, 2010).

Background

Plaintiff Knight filed an action against her former employer, Toe Brights, Inc. (TBI), and two of its officers/directors/stockholders, alleging that they failed to pay her more than $9,000 in salary and reimbursement for expenses that was due at the time of her termination, and also failed to repay a loan from her to TBI in the amount of $41,783. Id. TBI filed its answer to Knight’s complaint, and alleged as an affirmative defense that “Plaintiff’s action is barred by any arbitration agreement requiring that this action be arbitrated.”  Id.

Defendants moved to compel arbitration about eight months after plaintiff Knight filed her suit.  Id. *1.  By that time, defendants had propounded multiple sets of discovery to which Knight had responded, and numerous discovery motions were pending.  Id. Defendants had claimed “priority” in discovery, and then refused to respond to Knight’s discovery.  Id. The court ordered the matter to arbitration less than three months before the date set for trial. Id.

The case proceeded through arbitration, and the arbitrator awarded Knight $40,000 for the repayment of her loan plus “interest at the statutory rate from the date she filed her lawsuit”.  Id. *4. Knight did not prevail on her other claims for unauthorized use of her jewelry designs, name and likeness, and the arbitrator awarded defendants $60,000 in attorney fees and $1,160 in filing fees as the prevailing parties on some of Knight’s claims. Id. The arbitrator denied Knight’s motion for attorney fees  and costs. Id. Read the rest of this entry »