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Posts Tagged ‘Wage’

Second District Holds That Piece Rate Employees Must Be Paid Separate Hourly Minimum Wage

In Averaging, Cal. State Court, Class Actions, Experts, Minimum Wage, Piece Rate, Use of Experts to Show Class Damages on April 2, 2013 at 4:02 pm
mercedes-driver at it’s best

mercedes-driver at it’s best (Photo credit: *MarS)

Today the Second District ordered published Gonzalez v. Downtown LA Motors, LP, et al., Case No. B235292, __ Cal. App. 4th __ (2d Dist. Mar. 6, 2013).  Gonzalez is a wage and hour class action where the question presented was whether California’s minimum wage law requires an employer that compensates its automotive service technicians on a “piece-rate” basis for repair work must also pay those technicians a separate hourly minimum wage for time spent during their work shifts waiting for vehicles to repair or performing other non-repair tasks directed by the employer.  Defendant automobile dealership contended it was not required to pay the technicians a separate hourly minimum wage for such time because it ensured that a technician’s total compensation for a pay period never fell below what the employer refers to as the “minimum wage floor” — the total number of hours the technician was at work during the pay period (including hours spent waiting for repair work or performing non-repair tasks), multiplied by the applicable minimum wage rate.  The employer supplemented pay, if necessary, to cover any shortfall.

The Court of Appeal concluded that class members were entitled to separate hourly compensation for time spent waiting for repair work or performing other non-repair tasks directed by the employer during their work shifts, as well as penalties under Labor Code section 203, subdivision (a).

The Court also affirmed the award of waiting time penalties in the amount of $237,840.

There is substantial evidence in the record to support an implied finding of willfulness. Read the rest of this entry »

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Central District Remands Minimum Wage and Overtime Class Action for Failure to Satisfy CAFA Amount in Controversy

In CAFA Jurisdiction, Remand on September 7, 2010 at 5:52 am
Parking Lot
Image by Roger Smith via Flickr

The Central District remanded a putative minimum wage and overtime class action suit in Munoz v. Central Parking Sys., Inc., No. CV 10-6172 PA (RCx), 2010 WL 3432239 (C.D. Cal. Aug. 30, 2010) (unpublished).

Plaintiff’s complaint attempted to avoid removal, stating “[i]t is believed that the total sum owed to the Class alleged herein is less than $5 million, based upon the anticipated size of the Class and the amount in controversy for each member of the Class.”  Id. *1. Read the rest of this entry »

Top 10 List of Things to Know About California’s Wage & Hour Laws

In Articles and Commentary on September 3, 2010 at 8:57 am
Go 10
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Jim Brown and Marc Koonin of the California Employment Law Letter offer a useful Top 10 list of “Need to Knows” about California wage & hour laws:

  1. Know California’s daily and weekly overtime rates for various hours worked;
  2. Overtime requirements apply to almost all types of wages, not just hourly wages or salaries;
  3. You must compensate employees for all hours you “suffer or permit” them to work;
  4. Be familiar with the specific “wage order” that applies to your workforce;
  5. Just because an employee is exempt as an executive, administrative, or professional employee under federal law, it doesn’t make him exempt under California law; Read the rest of this entry »

Labor Code Section 512 Does Not Apply to Public Employees

In Meal and Rest Breaks on August 23, 2010 at 6:29 am
WI: Ron Keenan, AFSCME 104, DC 24, worksite le...
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The First District Court of Appeal held that Labor Code section 512 and IWC Wage Order No. 17 do not apply to public employees.  California Correctional Peace Officer’s Association, et al. v. State of California, No. A125679, 2010 WL 3248794 (Cal. Ct. App. 1st Dist. Aug. 18, 2010).  The California Correctional Peace Officers’ Association (CCPOA) filed a class action, contending that the State of California violated various Labor Code provisions, as well as wage orders promulgated by the Industrial Welfare Commission (IWC), by failing to provide correctional officers with meal periods and by failing to pay for the missed wage periods. CCPOA argued that the Legislature intended that the State provide its correctional officers with meal periods as required by Labor Code section 512 and IWC Wage Order No. 17, and that the State must pay for missed meal periods as required by Labor Code section 226.7.  The court rejected this argument, holding that “the subject wage and hour statutes do not apply to public employees.”  Id. *1. Read the rest of this entry »